A Hard Look at Sun Protection Policies for Detained Juveniles

SKIN-The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine® Article: Sun Protection Policies in Juvenile Detention Centers in Pennsylvania

Among public juvenile detention centers in PA, we found an absence of policies to reduce sun exposure and a lack of knowledge about the CDC guidelines to prevent skin cancer.”

— Christen B. Samaan, BS

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES, March 12, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — A complete sun protection package includes avoidance of the midday sun, protective clothing, sunscreen, and shade seeking. For juveniles in particular, these tools can help avoid skin cancers down the line. However, children must be encouraged and educated on sun protection in order to make a meaningful impact.

A recent study published in SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine presents a survey of 12 juvenile detention centers who responded to questions on sun protection policies and attitudes within their institutions. Samaan et al asked the respondents questions on whether they allowed child residents to use hats, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Unfortunately, most facilities did not allow residents to use all of these sun protection options. The authors note “The CDC’s guidelines include recommendations for schools to encourage skin cancer prevention on school property and elsewhere. However, these guidelines are not equally implemented across all the institutions responsible for school-aged populations, such as children in juvenile detention centers.”

Altering the current policies and effectively implementing them into the real world would likely have an impact on future skin cancer rates among the detained population. The authors acknowledge that more research needs to done in other states and incarceration settings. Samaan et al. note “Among public juvenile detention centers in PA, we found an absence of policies to reduce sun exposure and a lack of knowledge about the CDC guidelines to prevent skin cancer. Despite these results, administrators are largely in favor of stronger policies and believe sun exposure is an important health issue.”

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine® is a peer-reviewed online medical journal that is the official journal of The National Society for Cutaneous Medicine. The mission of SKIN is to provide an enhanced and accelerated route to disseminate new dermatologic knowledge for all aspects of cutaneous disease.

For more details please visit www.jofskin.org or contact jofskin@gmail.com.

Link to article

(DOI: 10.25251/skin.3.2.40)

Christen B. Samaan
Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine
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Source: EIN Presswire